About your Search

20130318
20130326
SHOW
Book TV 15
Cavuto 15
Hannity 11
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWSW 110
FBC 97
MSNBCW 89
CNNW 77
CSPAN 63
SFGTV2 61
CSPAN2 59
CNBC 57
SFGTV 56
KQED (PBS) 42
KRCB (PBS) 24
KTVU (FOX) 21
KNTV (NBC) 19
CURRENT 18
KGO (ABC) 15
LINKTV 15
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 892
Search Results 200 to 249 of about 900 (some duplicates have been removed)
this is going to benefit the country or the economy. >> wayne is the first person to repeat this over and over. panelsy pelosi said let's pass so it we can read it. they don't even know the definition of a full time employee yet. is this woman full time? she doesn't know. all she knows is she's probably not gettingealth care. >> before you answer that, i'm holding a copy of the u.s. constitution in my hand which i carry with me at all times. i page through this time and time again and i can't find anywhere in it that says government can require me to purchase something. >> well, eric, it's unfortunate. the government is -- it's a fashous government. they cans for you to do anything they want to. why we're celebrating something that is a horror like obama care is hond me. you're talking about a birthday, i'll tell you what. birthday you see this cookie, well, the cookie crumbles. see. that's what happens. because it's not worth anything. and they should turn around and get rid of it. >> we're laughing but the economy really rests on health care. 16 or 17% of the economy. if this fails this is a
picture this is going to benefit the country or the economy. >> we're going to repeat this over and over again. nancy pelosi says let's pass it so we can read it. they don't know the definition of a full time employee. all she knows she probably not getting healthcare. >> eric: i'm holding a constitution in the hand which i carry with me. i page through this. i can't find government can require me to purchase something. >> eric, it's unfortunate. the government, it's a fascist government. they can force you to do anything they wanted to do. why we are celebrating something that is horror like obamacare is beyond me. you are talking about a birthday. i tell you what, here is the birthday. you see this cookie, the cookie crumbles. [ laughter ] >> it's not worth anything. they should turn around get rid of it. >> eric: we're laughing but the economy rests on healthcare. 15-17% of the economy, if this fails we're in deep trouble. >> everybody left and right says we have to get the costs under control. look, i'm glad you got a cake here eric because what the folks on the right is help themsel
might go a little higher. that has an inflationary effect on the economy. so you may be talking away the money you just gave that employee through the increase. raise prices throughout the economy. >> i have to say, you've now switched your argument from what it was going to do to your business to what it's going to do to the economy. >> very sharp, senator warren. whether a minimum wage increase and why. we've heard all this madness on the other side, especially small business people. we won't be able to pay insurance and the like. is that a real reasonable and persuasive argument? >> no and in fact, we have a real world experiment that tells us about this. in new jersey a few years ago, they raised the minimum wage. they did it in pennsylvania. there was an examination of fast food and it turned out that in new jersey, hiring went up and in pennsylvania, hiring went down. but let me turn this upside down. why aren't we talking about the fact that the total stock market is worth less today than in 2000 and yet, the ceos are getting more and more money. if we just turned this argumen
at home, what do we do about our economy so we don't become a cyprus isn't senate passed its first real bottoming proposal in more than four years. but many americans are worried that lawmakers are kicking the can down the road. the majority say they are slightly less nervous about the economy than they were in 2010. an overwhelming number of us think the number-1 challenge to our economy is the continuing, mounting debt. we have a former media spokesperson for george w. bush and a democratic political consultant to hillary clinton for president. mersaides and richard, welcome to both of you. americans are sick of this. look at the debt clock this. thing keeps whizzing up. the debt is mounting. every sunday, i show this. it has gone up another trillions, it seems, theres and multi-millions. mercedes, how do we stop that in its tracks and make it go the other way? >> we can't stop it when you have the budget plan that senator murray has pushed through. 50 of all, because it has such little support from american voters. for example, we saw a poll saying that only 28% of likely voters sup
records, taking, and larryeating bails glazer from the economy summit. and bruce is in pennsylvania where the snow has begun. reporter: well, neil, that heavy snow from this morning has turn into light snow this afternoon and now more of a freezing rain. literally minutes ago the sun made an appears and that is rare. no blizzard here but another significant snowfall. two or throw inches around most of the region, now a slushy mess. it began this morning. we expect it will not wrap up until late tonight. this is actually the 11th day in the month of march with some kind of trace amount of snow or more. none of them any big deal but all of them irritating. last month, one day with a trace of snow. temperatures much colder this march. the average high 15 degrees colder this march than last march, and just two days in the entire month of march that the national weather service would regard as clear, day where the sun was actually out. a fair number of fender benders this morning, but overall more of a slushy mess than a real danger. the temperatures are expected to get down near freezing, so
's going in the wrong direction now. sandra: saying more federal spending will help the economy, not something that all of us believe is true to be the case. >> no, but i got to go back a little bit there. it's absolutely true that he did miscalculate because neither the president nor myself nor many rational people -- sandra: would he admit that? >> yeah, i think he might, i don't know. nobody thought the house republicans were crazy enough to go through this ridiculous -- sandra: were they crazy? the sun came up. we get through the airport lines -- >> let me address that -- you guys had a ball on this, well, the sun came up, nothing changed. you may live to regret that because, you know, these problems are coming, and, in fact, today, michele bachmann, of all people, was decrying the sequester. why? because an airport in her district lost its tower and has been affected. the cuts are coming. in fact, the only thing that's fore stalled it a bit is the deal made on the continuing resolution. sandra: dan, i argue, however, immediately following, we saw the government, the adminis
want to discourage. at a time when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> i like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take idea and ke it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalom.com we put the law on your side. a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something import
.2948. >> some positive news for the european economy today. airbus has just signed the biggest civil aviation deal in history. it is with ryanair. >> it will provide a much-needed boost to the economy promising to secure 5000 jobs in france alone over the coming decade. >> the signatures are worth a lot of money. airbus will likely discount package of 234 plans, they have a list price of 18 billion euro. assembly will take part in france with parts from several european locations. it will be at capacity for four years. >> of bills meanwhile pride that we epitomize european success. we are working together to create jobs. >> the deal means more than money and well paying jobs. ryanair is a new customer for airbus. they have previously purchased all their planes from their arrival, boeing. >> the western-backed opposition is meeting in istanbul to p ick the new prime minister. the first tasks is creating a cabinet. >> the conflict is expected to escalate further with britain and france say they plan on our main local groups. especially when it comes to political and military priorities, they do
by the state was a potential death now for the housing and our taxes stopped the growth of our economy. we in this room and many of us working together took on the story changes for our city some of which have vexed for years >> years. i'm proud that together we through innovation and we foerjd our way ahead. to the city commissioners and to the department heads and to our friends in the business, labor you think non-profit and other communities who spent countless hours with us in negotiations and to the great people of san francisco who rewarded us with your support at ballet in san francisco thank you, very much. together we're putting san francisco back on the right track and building a solid foundation for all our residents. my fellow san francisco's we're living in a time of astonishing innovation and unlimited process we're driving that innovation and for or against the future right here right now not just for san francisco but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world w
to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road that leads to trouble or and is the one of the 3 san franciscans who went there know we must continue to pre
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some wealthy russians or wealthy companies that had money in there that they would lose a substantial portion of, perhaps 50% of the uninsured deposits if they do a wind down. if they have a margin call, you know what i'm saying? some kind of ripple effect maybe related to a russian company or a russian individual. but when
term, do you think this economy improves second half or do you think it slows down? >> i think, as a matter of fact, we're probably in the second quarter. you'll start seeing slow growth. but i think as this summer winds, you know, goes through, we'll start seeing some growth again. i do think that by the end of the year, we're going to be not a lot higher, but i think we'll be at all-time highs as the year goes on. probably the the end of the summer, the third quarter going into the fourth quarter. i'm positive. >> so bill, because the s&p capital iq estimates call for 0.6% growth the first quarter and then it goes up to 7%. so they're expecting profits to actually reaccelerate second half. >> lee munson, you're the only outside guest buying stocks here. what are you buying here? >> you know, i'm just focusing where i need to get some more exposure. i'm focusing first on emerging markets. they've lagged year-to-date. i think they can outperform by december 31st. i like the emerging markets to add more money today. i would also say, add more money to the s&p 500 today. the only
investors are among the foreign investors in the economy? there must be significant bank deposit losses. the program must tackle the problem at the root. sure that thee plan is in place without dipping cyprus into debt and on sustainability. cyprus has agreed to close down its second-biggest bank, but once to hold on to the biggest. perhaps the biggest problem is the imf and germany, but to be fair they said no, they want to close the bank, even if it means thousands of job losses. >> the syrian forces are reported to have been firing at each other in the highest. the cat -- an informant captured, missiles with ammunition from the base being taken. it is near a highway to the capital. the same base was captured after two weeks of heavy fighting. the arab league has given the syrian seek to the opposition council. one of many countries to recognize them as the legitimate representatives of the syrian people. we are just the sight of the meeting. >> the meeting is ongoing, but i can say that an arab official attended based on the seats from the syrian national coalition. remember in march
a gloomy new report on the state of retirement savings. >> the recent headlines about the economy as we've talked about have been pretty good but the lingering effect of the great recession is that a lot of americans have had to dip into their savings to get by. and of course that could be a problem in the years to come for many americans. they're supposed to be the golden years. but a new report says retirement like this is way out of reach for most americans who just aren't socking away enough. even with markets near record highs, the confidence workers have in their retirement is low. the employee benefit research institute found that 49% of americans aren't sure they'll be able to retire comfortably and they're not doing much about it. >> it's one of the scariest things is that it is not just that people don't have a lot of retirement savings. it's they don't know what they need. they don't know what they don't have. so, you know, what you would like to see is more people really sitting down with an adviser doing some hard math. instead, people seem to be crossing their fingers and
that the eurozone crisis may be impacting that region's biggest economy. crude fell 1.1% settling, $92.45 a barrel. sandra: miners outperforming as gold ends the session higher, still above the $1600 mark which everybody is watching im gold and newmont mining, barrick gold, kinross, all top performers up, between two and 4%. adam: you like banks? financial sector feeling the squeeze again as the turmoil in cypress continues to play out without a resolution. goldman sachs and morgan stanley, they led the declines. sandra: who needs a wallet? the mobile payment industry is one of the fastest growing areas in tech. $171 billion. we're telling you how to add some cash it your portfolio by investing in this cashless trend. adam: we've got new data out showing more consumers are cutting the chord and saying good-bye to pay it. v services. time warner, are you listening? does the trend mean you should say good-bye to cable stocks? a top on lift tells us which names will feel the pain and which ones will ride this trend to cash success. "after the bell" starts right now. sandra: first we'll tell you what
for a retirement crisis even as the stock market sits near highs and the economy shows improvement. host: so we're getting your take on this. your retirement andization. tell us if you are and why and if you are not, why not? it's a story in the "usa today" as well this morning confidence in retirement continues to flail about this report, because americans have to cope with many immediate financial concerns retirement is taking a backseat. only 2% of workers and a% of retirees say retirement is their most pressing issues. among other worries -- host: at least many americans have a more realistic perspective about retirement says the senior vice president of retirement and investor services at the principle financial group. host: in arkansas, a democrat, are you saving? caller: yes, i save every penny i can get my hands on. host: 401-k or how are you saving? caller: c.d.'s and bank accounts that are ensured. host: why not put it in the market? caller: i can't afford to lose it. i've seen too many people lose their behinds and with what little money i've saved all my life, i can't afford to lose
industry is a more efficient supplier of funds to the real economy than banks. it is simply less costly to sell bonds, notes and commercial paper to investors than to borrow from a bank. finish since the mid 1980s by intermediating these transactions, the securities industry has supplied 15 times more financing to the real economy than banking. and it has done so without government prudential regulation. when the financial crisis came, lightly-regulated investment bank withs like bear stearns, lehman brothers and merrill lynch did no worse than heavily-regulated fdic-insured commercial banks like wachovia, washington mutual and indy mac. so it's hard to see that more and titled regulation is really the answer. what we are watching in the name of prudential regulation is the government gradually squeezing the life out of the banking industry the way the interstate commerce commission gradually squeezed the life out of the railroads. if we let the government insure and provide prudential regulation to the securities business as some regulators have now proposed, we'll pay a heavy price in
territory showing eastern manufacturing growth in february. so is all of this a sign the economy is improving? joining me now is michelle gerard, most fabulous u.s. economist for rbs. [laughter] how do you like that? did you know your title had been changed? >> i'm going to get my business cards reprinted. melissa: fabulous, why not? [laughter] talk to me about this data. did it make you feel good about the economy? is it a sign we're moving in the right direction? >> i tell you, you know, i -- it's hard for me to believe that the economy, um, is doing as well as it is. i mean, we've still got all the uncertainty about washington, and i think, you know, what's going on in cyprus is a reminder we shouldn't be so complacent about the eurozone, but the economy is really looking to be doing better than i, um, had even hoped that it would be. you mentioned the jobless claims numbers. i mean, there's something going on there. the trend there is nicely, has moved down nicely. it really kind of corroborates the strength we've seen in the employment numbers in the last couple of months. w
of the economy is about 18 billion euros, so the banking industry is four times the size of the economy. if you allow the banks to fail, much like letting citibank or jpmorgan here in the united states, that would have significant repercussion the in the economy. connell: where do you stand on the idea of the con cement spreading? could it happen in other countries was the question asked, it seemed like, in the markets this morning if it goes through on cypress, on to the next guy and next who have problems? >> that's a legitimate concern that the architect or one of the principle architects here, the imf, the ecb, and the european union and germany with a strong hand there. if they force this upon one country, who is to say they couldn't force it upon a larger, more important country? if europe were able to execute a plan like that, who is to say that the united states wouldn't look and say, well, they did it in europe, why couldn't we look here? connell: rule of law question; right? >> exactly. dagen: what's the solution? somewhere between forcing the haircut and letting banks fail? where is
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
until you topple the entire economy. >> there budget is built on a hoax. on the one handled they say it balances in ten years. on the other hand they say they repeal obama care. but they keep the savings in obama care. if you would repeal obama care today, their budget would not be in balance. >> you saw him there, the democratic congressman, the top democrat on the committee. good to see you. >> good to be with you. >> in the past hour, you announced what you're calling a house democratic budget alternative. first of all, what is it and how is it different from the previous plan offered by the senate? >> well, it is similar to the senate plan. in other words, we also focus on job creation and accelerating the economy right now. then we address the long term budget deficit in a balanced way where we ask for shared responsibility as opposed to the republican plan which provides another tax break wind fall to very wealthy people at the end of everybody else. the expense of the middle class, the expense of commitments to seniors. so our focus right now is to number one, do no harm to th
of the country. high taxation and high debt are holding back the economy and the g.o.p. believes mr. obama is creating a nation at war with itself. the affluent vs. the nonaffluent. over the weekend senator ted cruze of texas, a conservative, delivered a very emotional speech at cpac. >> my father came from cuba. he had been in prison. he had been tortured in cuba. and he came to texas with nothing, with 100 in his underwear. didn't speak a word of english. washed dishes making 50 cents an hour. in someone had came up to that 18-year-old kid avenue as he was washing dishes and suggested to him that 55 years hence his son would be sworn into office as a united states senator representing the great state of texas. [ applause ] that would have been unimaginable. >> now mr. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily b
stand? and israel's minister of the economy is here to answer our questions. >>> plus, mayor michael bloomberg called starbucks ceo ridiculi ridiculist. >>> and the head of colorado's department of corrections answers the door only to be shot down. we take you to the manhunt tonight. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight with friends like these, well, president obama arrived in israel to day. it was his first trip there as president. everything seemed rosey for a little while between him and benjamin netanyahu. >> and just as we have for these past 65 years, the united states is proudo stand with you as your strongest ally and your greatest friend. >> i want to thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening the friendship and alliance between our two countries. >> sounded so perfect. but then -- later in the day things changed. >> iran is a grave threat to israel, a grave threat to the world, a nuclear iran. the united states is committed to dealing with it. >> each country has to make its own decisi
to our economy? >> what it means to our economy, the lawmakers, what gaur gary b is correct. voters are not against this, voters are against this. and like trying to find the bravest frenchman, it's tough to find an honest one out there. >> and this is by the way-- >> and this is the entire french vote and i don't care how. >> they don't want this. >> and here is the difference, here is the difference. >> and one thing about this is, even if everybody in the world is doing it, it is still wrong. congress comes out and says, we don't want pork and they also said we're going to stand up for simpson bowls and cut spending and raise revenue, we can't do that. they all say they're against pork and every single one of them do it, it's a systemic problem and it's a character problem that we have indeed seen and it means these guys are not doing it for our country. >> john, one thing, take a breath for god's sake. the issue here is that if jonas got, you know, the extra bonus coming early. taxpayers weren't paying for it. in this situation, clearly, taxpayers who in theory brought congressm
in three months and that would be the major comptroller of european all legal and economy. they would expose the company is about how the standard oe executives for supporting the nazis piece of meat headlines and lead to congressional investigations. the columnists would benefit by getting a lot of juicy items. in his letters he details how he met with landrieu pearson and he exchanged these items and bragged that he became so close to drew pearson in particular that he became regarded as one of the family. in his role as a propagandist, dahl started to make a name for himself in washington and his short stories started earning him quite a bit of a claim as a young writer and one of them and particular, sort of particularly affecting the young fable that he wrote for children and was published in the ladies' home journal was about a little gremlins that tinkered with the ref pilot planes to arouse sympathy for the british ref pilots. a particularly appealed to eleanor roosevelt who read the story to her grandchildren and in short order invited to the white house for dinner eleanor ro
popular. you have very high unemployment. you have a very weak economy. it was interesting that in the obama recovery, family income went down to $2,500 a year, where during the recession, income went down $1,500 a year. families were doing worse, yet in the campaign, obama ran an extremely good campaign, and he won despite his disadvantages and he won frankly in a predictable way. he made the election about his opponent. the romney people allowed obama to define romney. this was rather than romney defining romney, and that is why it is important for republicans to look back and say, what did we do wrong? the idea that the republican party is in some terrible shape -- certainly i do not buy that. i have seen terrible shape. i remember watergate, i remember when the 13% of americans identified themselves as republicans, and the national chairman appointed people to see if we should change the name of the party. for 40 years, the most number of republicans in the house was 192. today we have 230 something, and it is absolutely right to figure out what you did wrong, and the o
if constant budget deficits are going to ruin the economy they're taking an awful long time about doing so. the real fact about the budget is that the deficit has to be sustainable. but basically the government is a lot more like a company than it is like a household. and a company has debt as part of its permanent capital structure and it can have that debt forever. if the company keeps grog, it can take on more debt. similarly if we run a budget deficit, so long as it is small enough relative to the amount of economy is growing over the long-term that can be sustainable. we have to shrink the budget deficit over time, but not all the way to zero. the democrats are closer to correct on this point where the republicans have been attacking them because their budget doesn't balance over ten years. the budget shouldn't balance over ten years. >> i think you hit a key point. it's all about growth. you can grow your way out of deficits. we saw it during the clinton administration. it's also about looking at how far we've come. if you actually look at what we've already done in terms of getting
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
is a big concern. china is a big concern. they said china's economy is showing symptoms that sparked the crisis in 2008, the warning and saying they risk financial crisis. obviously, concerns about china. i'm going to stick to the cypress theme and put it together. the vix, fear index popped. you see the 1275 right now, up 17%. at one point, up 13%. right now, let's look at the financials because they certainly reacted. in some cases, dramatically, and the idea of them taxing deposits there. citigroup down 2% and banks abroad hit harder. back to you. >> a full and complete report, thank you, nicole. >> for the bailout proposal, is the tax on bank deposits, and that is sparking outrage and fear that there's going to be a run on the banks there. david, chairman and chief investment officer of dumb beer land as visiers of -- cumberland, and why do you think it's a big deal, david? >> caller: well, the finance ministers, the decision has been announced. the cat is out of the bag. once you open the door to taxing a deposit when you have a liquidity crisis, you can never close the door aga
of energy conclude we can safely export natural gas, this is not even about a trade off between the economy and the environment. we can do these projects, prevents these projects will stop a lot of jobs from being created, it is not going to make a development in global emissions. it making no sense to me and the economy. neil: malia. >> i just quickly top say, i understand how we like to take things and combine themm but, i do not think that the only reason why keystone project is not happening is because, barack obama asked his agency this question, to get back to original topic, what i think is really important for us to look forward and you know neil, i don't think that anyone would disagree with you that jobs are important, the problem with laser beam focus you have a society and a lot of things that need to be focused on, laser beaming becomes narrowing, i don't think that is how we' our president or anyone in congress to just have like this one bullet silver bullet solution on what will save the u.s., that is not only thing that u.s. nee right now, we not only have a jobs problem. ne
good performance of the german economy throughout the year. actually, we are forecasting a growth from around 2% quarter on quarter. and this is on the back of very strong labor markets. >> 2% growth in which quarter? >> basically on average. >> over the year. >> no. for the full year, i would have 11%. but quarter on quarter, up around 2%. why is that? very strong labor market, very strong export. i think more importantly, we should look at next month's bmis. the u.s. data came very strong. we should see a strong performance in germany on the back of the exports. >> you could make that argument on the pmi in germany and it was surprisingly weak. a deep contraction in the fourth quarter was going to rebound now called into question. >> i think this will be the growth. but you've seen in the labor market, you've seen hard data, actually, a strong performance of the economy. so we -- i think we should not expect a continuous increasing pmi, a continuous increase in ifo business index. i think the big question is the next one, in my opinion, just what they said, the u.s. bring very strong
live" starts right now. >> megyn: fox news alert how one country's economy is saved from the brink of collapse in an unprecedented move that experts say comes at a major cost for anyone who uses a bank. think your money is safe? welcome to "america live" everyone, i'm megyn kelly. a tiny little island nation of cyprus has decided today that it will fix its financial crisis by taking people's money. and that's the ultimate solution. they will seize 30-- no, make that 40% being of every bank account in which the person has over 100,000 euros, about 120 or 30,000. and that's your thanks for having money in the cypriot banks and now there are questions about the global cost of the rescue and people find new limits to the trust we put in banks. greg palkot live in cyprus outside the parliament there. greg? >> reporter: yeah, that's right, that's right, megyn. the folks here in cyprus are breathing a sigh of relief, their country is not going bankrupt, but the price paid could be high for the people here and around the world. and with the european union to cough up its share of the money
nation of cypress is safe for now. the last effort to bail out and save its economy, but the solution that has bank depositors and investors everywhere now nervous. the largest banks are taking up to 40% of all bank deposits more than 100,000 euros or $129,000 or higher leaving smaller deposits untouched. optimism over the deal initially pushed the s&p 500 to within a point of its all time high of 1565 in early trading. stocks told off the cypress bailout is a template for the ways in which the eurozone will address future bank problems and bailouts. the dow jones industrial average fell 64 # points, s&p down five, and the nasdaq lost ten points. on the domestic front, president obama called upon congress to, quote, finish the job on immigration. speaking during a citizenship ceremony at the white house, president obama stressed the importance of getting something done. >> we have known for years that the immigration system is broken, not doing enough to harness the ingenuity of those who work hard to find a place here in america, and after avoiding the problem for years, the time has
to do it this way, as for 2014, i thi it depends on the circumstances in the economy. if there is more obama fatigue. lou: can i say, watching the republican party with all prevail -- tre veil, i think that everyone better give up on idea of doing anything with the democrats and letting the economy doing the intellectual heavy lifting for the republican party, they better get ready to go. because, this is not going to be a default election, just as 2012 was. i have to -- i hate to do it, but we have to right there. anyway, thank yo thank you very, that is it for us, we hope you will be us tomorrow, congressman frank wolf of join us. on what is going on in the obama justice department, from new york. york. >> you know every liberal's dream that government seizing your money out right, there is nothing you can do about it. now no cyprus they could find out the hard way, this tiny island nation sent a tsunami shockwave to the rest of the world, keeping the banks closed until they find a more palatable way to. welcome i am neil cavuto, you got 10 grand in a bank account. how about waking
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
companies. real innovative companies popping up. that is what i worry about the u.s. economies. where are those bold innovative companies. and i would make another footnote about the buybacks. yes, record numbers since 2009. but that is because the feds are buying back their own shares. they say let them pass the stress test. they really struggle and diluted earnings per share. diluted their capital base with a lot of shares during the crisis. they have basically flooded the market to recapitalize and buying it back. the. neil: in cyprus explodes and banks reopened, let's see what happens to the residents of cyprus. people say oh, we are there for you. then you realize that they aren't. have a good weekend >> welcome, i am shibani joshi and four gerri willis. we will tackle the new blackberry. as i don't have anything to worry about? we will discover andalk about that as well. and the faa starts to close air traffic control towers. we will tell you how that ca affect your travel plans going into the spring. but first, raising $8.5 billion and euros needed to see the bailout from the e
own way. toyou can go to c-span.org check out "first ladies." spoke about the economy and monetary policy. you can see all of the news conference tonight a on c-span. , our policy has two main elements. first, we decided to continue purchasing mortgage-backed perrities at a pace of -- month. it bears to emphasize that the committee has described this program in terms of a monthly pace of purchases rather than a total amount of expected purchases. evolution of the program to economic criteria. within this framework, the committee can vary the pace of purchases. at this meeting, the committee judge -- second, the committee kept the target to the federal fund rate. it will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the purchase program ends and if the economic recovery strengthens. the low range for the fund rate will be appropriate as long as the unemployment rate remains above 6.5%. if economic conditions provided in the guidance are a threshold and not triggers, crossing one or more these marshaled will not automatically lead to an increase in rates. rather the committee will
in a trillion dollars. you would still be left with a deficit and you would wreck the economy. martha: interesting lesson. stuart, thanks very much. we'll be watching it throughout the day as i know you will. let's look at bigger picture of europe's debt crisis. five countries needed bailouts from the european central bank and imf. greece, spain, ireland, portugal as stuart mentioned. germany the fifth biggest. great britain at number eight. france with the 9th largest. italy at number ten. they all shrunk in the last quarter of last year. europe is basically contracting. the eurozone is losing huge numbers of jobs. a record 19 million people are unemployed. it is a tough picture and one we need to watch closely here at home. bill: sure do. no telling when that thing will get straightened out. >>> more rough water for carnival cruise lines. another disabled ship of vacationers, limping back to port. legend arriving yesterday. a leading senator calling for a passenger bill of rights. what would be in that bill? peter doocy live in washington. what would this bill of rights do, peter? >
that we can't do anything about climate change that the experts are urging us to do and keep our economy growing. what's the argument to respond to that? >> well, i'll tell you, that is a myth. it's a false choice. it's a zero sum game. you either can grow the economy or you can protect the environment, okay? so i changed the question, and i've been doing this now for several years. i said, okay, here's the question: do you believe that protecting the environment harms the economy and costs jobs, has no impact on the economy or jobs, or actually grows the economy and improves jobs? okay? and what do we find? an overwhelming majority of americans, and i'm talking like two-thirds of americans, say that it either has no impact or it actually improves the economy. in fact, that's the most frequently chosen answer is that most americans don't see this as an inherent contradiction. >> what you're saying is that a big powerful industry controls or affects the outcomes of perception in this country disproportionately to what most people think? >> that's right. and, in part, they're able to do th
. and stay the course. that's the message from the fed chairman ben bernanke today. he says our economy is improving but it still needs help. so the fed will keep interest rates at record low levels and will keep buying $85 billion in bonds each month. stocks like that, the dow up 56 points. briefly hitting a new record. the nasdaq up 25. the s&p up 10. of course, investors the world over are still watching the tiny island nation of cyprus as it nears possible bankruptcy. banks there are closed for the rest of the week now. and lawmakers are working on a plan b after parliament rejected a proposal to tax people's savings accounts. the fox business network peter barnes is live in the newsroom in washington. how concerned is the fed about cyprus? >> well, shep, he said the feted is paying attention to it, monitoring cyprus carefully. he said that so far its problems don't appear to be spreading to the u.s. or other countries. and that's the big concern here that this could become a contagion and trigger another financial crisis. but, bernanke suggested cyprus is unique, that its banking s
Search Results 200 to 249 of about 900 (some duplicates have been removed)